Hot Best Seller

The Complete Maus (Maus #1-2)

Availability: Ready to download

Combined for the first time here are Maus I: A Survivor's Tale and Maus II - the complete story of Vladek Spiegelman and his wife, living and surviving in Hitler's Europe. By addressing the horror of the Holocaust through cartoons, the author captures the everyday reality of fear and is able to explore the guilt, relief and extraordinary sensation of survival - and how the Combined for the first time here are Maus I: A Survivor's Tale and Maus II - the complete story of Vladek Spiegelman and his wife, living and surviving in Hitler's Europe. By addressing the horror of the Holocaust through cartoons, the author captures the everyday reality of fear and is able to explore the guilt, relief and extraordinary sensation of survival - and how the children of survivors are in their own way affected by the trials of their parents. A contemporary classic of immeasurable significance.


Compare

Combined for the first time here are Maus I: A Survivor's Tale and Maus II - the complete story of Vladek Spiegelman and his wife, living and surviving in Hitler's Europe. By addressing the horror of the Holocaust through cartoons, the author captures the everyday reality of fear and is able to explore the guilt, relief and extraordinary sensation of survival - and how the Combined for the first time here are Maus I: A Survivor's Tale and Maus II - the complete story of Vladek Spiegelman and his wife, living and surviving in Hitler's Europe. By addressing the horror of the Holocaust through cartoons, the author captures the everyday reality of fear and is able to explore the guilt, relief and extraordinary sensation of survival - and how the children of survivors are in their own way affected by the trials of their parents. A contemporary classic of immeasurable significance.

46 review for The Complete Maus (Maus #1-2)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    oh my god. This burrowed it's way deep into my heart. This made me feel so much. This was an experience, not just a "read". This was real and I can't even explain how this affected me because it was the most emotional thing I've ever read. Not made-up emotion. This was REAL and it affected me. Vladek. He reminded me of my Grandfather, a little. I loved my Grandfather and I loved Vladek. His story, as told to his son Art Spiegelman, was one of the most powerful stories I've ever experienced. This w oh my god. This burrowed it's way deep into my heart. This made me feel so much. This was an experience, not just a "read". This was real and I can't even explain how this affected me because it was the most emotional thing I've ever read. Not made-up emotion. This was REAL and it affected me. Vladek. He reminded me of my Grandfather, a little. I loved my Grandfather and I loved Vladek. His story, as told to his son Art Spiegelman, was one of the most powerful stories I've ever experienced. This was a story about survival and deep love. The love shown between Vladek and Anja mesmerized me and broke my heart seeing them go through so much cruelty and suffering. The Complete Maus are two graphic novels combined to form the story of Vladek Spiegelman's life during World War 2. It is drawn masterfully in beautiful black and white. Jewish people are drawn as mice, German people are drawn as cats, Polish people are drawn as pigs and people from the U.S are drawn as dogs. From Wikipedia: "In making people of a single nationality look "all alike", Spiegelman hoped to show the absurdity of dividing people by these lines. In a 1991 interview, Spiegelman noted that "these metaphors... are meant to self-destruct in my book — and I think they do self-destruct." One of my favourite parts of Maus was the relationship between Art and Vladek. Art has a lot of guilt over having such an easy life when his parents went through a hell he couldn't even imagine. Even so, Art and Vladek have a pretty normal father/son relationship. I felt so bad for Vladek at times with the way Art would treat him but it was a normal father/son relationship in the way that sons don't always treat their fathers the best. Despite this, you could feel the love radiating from the pages. The love Art and Vladek had for each other. I loved the little funny moments in the novel, like when Vladek throws out Art's coat and gives him a "warm" coat, which Art hates because it isn't fashionable. Or when Vladek goes to the supermarket to return an open box of cereal, along with other used/opened groceries. Just the way Art draws his disapproving father made me smile. It was done with such warmth and love. Art's father was definitely a very funny man, even if he didn't mean to be. I loved Vladek so much and in the last few pages, you are shown a picture of Vladek during World War 2. At that moment, I had to stop myself from crying because after reading his incredible story, I saw a picture of the actual Vladek. And it instantly broke my heart. I felt so much love for him, it was unreal. This story is not a pleasant one but it is incredible. It's not easy to read at times but it's essential. It's about so many things. If you read this and it doesn't affect you, you are heartless. I recommend it to everyone. Seriously. Even if graphic novels aren't usually your thing. This is my favourite graphic novel now. There is no way that can change now. This was unforgettable and deeply moving. I LOVED it with all my heart and can't even properly express the love. Read it. Don't miss out on something so emotional and powerful. I hope you love it like I do.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Wonderful example of the power of a graphic novel! This is the “Complete” edition of “Maus: A Survivor’s Tale” collecting both parts: “My Father Bleeds History” and “And Here My Troubles Began”. OF MAUS AND MEN But these damn bugs are eating me alive! While it took long time of finally reading Maus,... ...I knew that it was a graphic novel referring about the Jew Holocaust, but using mice (Jews) and cats (Nazis) as the characters,... ...and even while I was sure that it will be a crude telling, Wonderful example of the power of a graphic novel! This is the “Complete” edition of “Maus: A Survivor’s Tale” collecting both parts: “My Father Bleeds History” and “And Here My Troubles Began”. OF MAUS AND MEN But these damn bugs are eating me alive! While it took long time of finally reading Maus,... ...I knew that it was a graphic novel referring about the Jew Holocaust, but using mice (Jews) and cats (Nazis) as the characters,... ...and even while I was sure that it will be a crude telling, I didn’t expect that the only difference between “reality” and this graphic novel would be the choice of using “animals” as the characters in the story. I mean, while I agree that Jew Holocaust isn’t a humorous matter, I supposed that it would be some “imaginative” use of places, tools, terms, etc… taking in account that the story was full of mice, cats and even pigs (with some frog or dog, here and there). Actually, I don’t know why using “animals” as characters if everything else in the story will be keep as it happened. Even there are some odd moments of a “female mouse person” scared due the presence of regular rats. Again, the Jew Holocaust is not a matter to take in comical way, but then, I think that the graphic novel could plainly use human beings (not necessarily too realistic, some cartoon style could work) and the graphic novel will be the same as good, the same as relevant. You know, as in the movie Life is Beautiful where the horrors of the Holocaust are there, but still there is space for some humorous moments, that they help as tension relief without meaning any disrespect to the tragic historic event. However, definitely the graphic format of this story makes possible for readers to be witness from the begining until the end (and even further) of the whole tragic and cruel process of what Jews endured (and not many were able to get out alive from it) during the World War II. A titanic graphic story constructed during years of artistic effort to show, with detail and authenticity, one of the darkest episodes of human history. LET MAUS WHO IS WITHOUT SIN... Friends? Your friends?... If you lock them together in a room with no food for a week… then you could see what it is, friends! The success of Maus obviously can tied to the reason of being a Jew Holocaust’s story, and almost any suc story receive a wide positive acceptance, but I think that what makes different Maus from many of similar stories is its bold honesty. Here, you won’t have a partial view of the tragic event or spotless characters. Obviously Nazis and Polish collaborators/sympathizers are shown doing their evil stuff, BUT also you will watch how Jews behaved with their own, robbing food from their fellow people, not doing any favor unless get paid with something (gold, food, cigarrettes, etc…), true, it was an extreme situation, but usually movies and other books don’t hesitate to show Nazi’s inhuman actions, but you have to realize that those were prisons, and life in prisons is tough and people will lose any humanity from them in the urge to survive. Also, Art Spiegelman, the author, was bold showing how hard was to live with his father, Vladek Spielgelman (the main character in the Holocaust parts), Vladek wasn’t a saint (and after all, how many of us really is?) with not only crazy habits but even racist thinking against afro-american people. Art Spiegelman is a character in the story too, and while he is a whole better as person than his father, he doesn’t portrait himself as a saint and you can appreciate how even at some moments, he does some kinda unfair actions, since after all, he is human too. His family is as disfunctional as others, being Holocaust’s survivors didn’t turn it magically into “Norman Rockwell paintings”. Anybody can create perfect heroes, only true writers are able to show the dark moments of his/her own family, in the middle of the storytelling of a book. In this way, with boldness and courage, Maus exposes us with a harsh truth: Survivors from a war aren’t necessarily good people, saved by their faith or spared due the purity of their souls. No. Survivors from a war (in most cases) is just because plain luck. Even some survivors got such bad luck of dying after the war ended and by non-military personnel. War is a crazy thing (any war) and if you try to get some logic out of it,... ...you will end as crazy as it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Raeleen Lemay

    The art style was a bit distracting at times, but I really enjoyed this!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    It didn’t dawn on me until later that this brilliant piece of graphic artistry and fiction is actually a very clever allegory. On the face of it, we’re led to believe that it’s a story of the terrible suffering perpetrated by the Nazis against the Jews in Poland and throughout Europe. But if you scratch beneath the surface, I think you’ll find that this particular holocaust story was made to symbolize something more pervasive and endemic. I speak of the horrific violence that persists to this da It didn’t dawn on me until later that this brilliant piece of graphic artistry and fiction is actually a very clever allegory. On the face of it, we’re led to believe that it’s a story of the terrible suffering perpetrated by the Nazis against the Jews in Poland and throughout Europe. But if you scratch beneath the surface, I think you’ll find that this particular holocaust story was made to symbolize something more pervasive and endemic. I speak of the horrific violence that persists to this day; that inflicted by cats on defenseless mice. Perhaps the most obvious clue that this is, in truth, the intended theme lies in the title itself: Maus. For those of you unfamiliar with German, this is their word for mouse. Beyond that, when you look carefully at the drawings, you see that the goose-steppers have distinctly feline features, while the persecuted Jews in the ghettos and camps have rodent-like proboscides and disproportionately small eyes. Cat on mouse violence is so old and pervasive that, in a way, we’ve become desensitized to it. Countless depictions of it in the arts have made it a stale, clichéd topic; almost cartoonish at times. That’s why I thought it was particularly effective to tell the story allegorically. When seen through the lens of the Jewish experience, and with Spiegelman’s masterstroke of personalizing the story by laying bare the difficult relationship he had with his father (the survivor), the residuum of cat brutality that can literally tear mice families apart is brought home to us in a very different way. Original: Mar 9, 2012 ------------------------ Addendum: Aug 23, 2013 This still ranks as my top graphic novel of all time, but I just finished Chris Ware's Building Stories which gives it a pretty good run for the money. The suffering in that one may not be as extreme, but it's every bit as real.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Councillor

    Until just a few weeks ago, the only reason for why I read graphic novels now and then was because of people's constant recommendations about the beauty and the value of those kinds of books. I will be honest; I am guilty of never believing those words. Most likely did I read graphic novels which didn't suit my personal tastes, but Art Spiegelman was capable of shattering my expectations and completely stunning me with the art of his writing and his illustrations. But let's start at the beginning Until just a few weeks ago, the only reason for why I read graphic novels now and then was because of people's constant recommendations about the beauty and the value of those kinds of books. I will be honest; I am guilty of never believing those words. Most likely did I read graphic novels which didn't suit my personal tastes, but Art Spiegelman was capable of shattering my expectations and completely stunning me with the art of his writing and his illustrations. But let's start at the beginning. Maus is a collection of two graphic novels with autobiographical background about the author, Art Spiegelman, and his father's recollections about his experiences in the Second World War. Spiegelman constantly switches between present and past, between the time when he writes down what his father tells him and the time when all the horrible events in the concentration camps took place. But he doesn't only include information about his father Vladek Spiegelman's tale of survival; the personal and very conflicted relationship between Art and Vladek also turns out to be a central part of the story, including controversy about Vladek's second wife and Art's personal approach to the success he had as an author when the first installment in his series of graphic novels was published. Obviously, memoirs or autobiographies always include potential to let their author shine in a bright light, to let them appear heroic and exemplary. You have to rely on what the author tells you about himself and the people surrounding him, on which layers of his own character he presents. Art Spiegelman did so in a very convincing way, pointing out not only the horrible crimes which were committed during the Nazi period, but also the flaws he and his father had themselves, as human beings with all their faults and mistakes. Art and his father appear in such a realistic way that you can't help but care for them; something which never happened to me before in a book with autobiographical content. Of course, some parts of the novels were shocking, which you need to expect before reading something about such an important subject. Feelings of despair and fear overshadowed Vladek Spiegelman's recollections of his experiences during the Second World War, from his family's decline and his marriage to his transport to Auschwitz. Perhaps the most memorable thing about those graphic novels is the way Art Spiegelman used animal heads in the place of recognizable human ones. The completely black-and-white illustrations vividly underline the feelings Spiegelman wanted to express with his books. And still now, almost two months after finishing them, am I stunned. Do I need to mention that I'd recommend these graphic novels to everyone?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Maus was more than I expected. I knew it would be about World War II and the Holocaust with the charaters being anthropomorphic mice, cats, pigs, dogs, etc. What I didn't realize was it would expand even farther in to the specific lives of the Spiegelmans before, during, and after the war. Throughout the book the artist/author is a featured character struggling with his curmudgeonly father while he tries to document the story of his father's time in 1930s and 40s Poland and Germany. His experienc Maus was more than I expected. I knew it would be about World War II and the Holocaust with the charaters being anthropomorphic mice, cats, pigs, dogs, etc. What I didn't realize was it would expand even farther in to the specific lives of the Spiegelmans before, during, and after the war. Throughout the book the artist/author is a featured character struggling with his curmudgeonly father while he tries to document the story of his father's time in 1930s and 40s Poland and Germany. His experiences with his father are as much a part of the book as the stories he is trying to document. Another viewpoint of life under Nazi oppression is always riviting. I have read and seen both fiction and non-fiction accounts of life during WWII. I have been to the Dachau concentration camp. These stories are important, but are not always easy to read or tell. I applaud Spiegelman for this creative approach that hopefully brings these stories to those who might not be inclined to read a big novel or watch a documentary. Basically everyone should read this or at least some stories of the war. They say those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    F

    I loved this. Harsh brutality of WW2. Loved the drawings, the black & white and the jumping back and forth between time.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Orsodimondo

    MAI PIÙ JAMAIS PLUS NEVER AGAIN Un bellissimo fumetto? Uno splendido romanzo? E perché non un ottimo film? (In fondo le dimensioni delle vignette di Spiegelman fanno davvero venire in mente i fotogrammi di un film 35 mm). I nazisti descrivevano gli ebrei come immondi parassiti, portatori di peste e corruzione, che invadono l’Europa (qualcuno adesso prova a usare la stessa immagine per chi arriva d’oltremare): Spiegelman disegna gli ebrei come topi, i nazisti come gatti, i polacchi come maiali. Anim MAI PIÙ JAMAIS PLUS NEVER AGAIN Un bellissimo fumetto? Uno splendido romanzo? E perché non un ottimo film? (In fondo le dimensioni delle vignette di Spiegelman fanno davvero venire in mente i fotogrammi di un film 35 mm). I nazisti descrivevano gli ebrei come immondi parassiti, portatori di peste e corruzione, che invadono l’Europa (qualcuno adesso prova a usare la stessa immagine per chi arriva d’oltremare): Spiegelman disegna gli ebrei come topi, i nazisti come gatti, i polacchi come maiali. Animali parlanti per esprimere condizioni umane profonde difficili da esprimere altrimenti (Esopo, Fedro, La Fontaine). E perché no, anche il Mickey Mouse disneyano. Spiegelman figlio intervista Spiegelman padre sulla Shoah (la madre è morta suicida, il fratello maggiore è morto avvelenato dalla zia, anche lei suicida, per evitargli l’orrore del campo di sterminio). Il racconto del padre è storia nota e stranota? A me sembra di sentirla per la prima volta, l'approccio di Spiegelman è unico e irripetibile. Una storia straziante? Sì, ma anche tanto tenera, romantica. Uomini topi più umani degli umani. In ogni caso, è una storia che bisogna continuare a raccontare, che non bisogna dimenticare. Che sorpresa la parte moderna, che regalo. Un rapporto padre e figlio che nella sua peculiarità è tuttavia paradigmatico. A Spiegelman è stato chiesto se non gli sembrava di cattivo gusto mettere in fumetti la tragedia dell’Olocausto. La sua risposta è stata: Di cattivo gusto è Auschwitz.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leonard Gaya

    The young Adolf Hitler applied twice for admission to the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, and each time was rejected. One may dream: had he been successful, he might have had a different fate, and, as a result, Europe’s history might have taken some other shape… Sixty years later, on another continent, the young Art Spiegelman applied to the High School of Art and Design in Manhattan and passed the exam. His parents, Vladek and Anja Spiegelman, were two Jews from Poland who survived through the The young Adolf Hitler applied twice for admission to the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, and each time was rejected. One may dream: had he been successful, he might have had a different fate, and, as a result, Europe’s history might have taken some other shape… Sixty years later, on another continent, the young Art Spiegelman applied to the High School of Art and Design in Manhattan and passed the exam. His parents, Vladek and Anja Spiegelman, were two Jews from Poland who survived through the Nazi ghetto of Sosnowiec and the extermination camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau. Maus, a massive graphic novel, thirteen years in the making, depicts the complicated relationship between Art and his father, the very process of creating Maus, and, in an interlocked way, Vladek’s experience, living in Poland during the rise and fall of the Third Reich. Back in those days, Hollywood was producing its most celebrated films, and Mickey Mouse had become the cutest little mascot on the silver screen. At that very moment, the Allied troops carried movie cameras into the concentration camps. The films that remain from that time —the ones that were shown during the Nuremberg trial— are tough to watch, haunting, almost impossible to put into words. Art Spiegelman has managed to blend both pictures (Disney and the Red Army file footage) poetically, through flat, condensed and straightforward drawings. His old father, a bit soft in the head and speaking in a funny broken English, provides a deeply personal, honest, at times slightly Kafkaesque or Chaplinesque account of these dreadful years, of that constant fear and deprivation, so that we could make some sense of this inhuman, world-changing experience. There’s a quote by Samuel Beckett somewhere in this book: "Every word is like an unnecessary stain on silence and nothingness”. This visual masterpiece is a refutation of this sentence. And it has left me both moved and dumbfounded.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Svetlana

    “The Jews are undoubtedly a race, but they are not human.” - Adolf Hitler This a graphic novel told from two timelines. In the narrative present, Art Spiegelman (author) is interviewing his father Vladek about his experiences as a Polish Jew and a Holocaust survivor. The narrative past depicts these very experiences from the mid 1930s to the end of the Holocaust in 1945. Spiegelman has utilised different species of animals to portray different nationalities and races - Jews as mice, Germans as “The Jews are undoubtedly a race, but they are not human.” - Adolf Hitler This a graphic novel told from two timelines. In the narrative present, Art Spiegelman (author) is interviewing his father Vladek about his experiences as a Polish Jew and a Holocaust survivor. The narrative past depicts these very experiences from the mid 1930s to the end of the Holocaust in 1945. Spiegelman has utilised different species of animals to portray different nationalities and races - Jews as mice, Germans as cats, Poles as pigs and French as frogs. I was actually inspired to read this after visiting a war museum with my friend. Though I had a lot of fun that day, the Holocaust Exhibition was one of the most harrowing and tragic things I have ever seen. During the exhibition, I realised how ignorant I had been to the extent of brutality, inhumanity and pain that was inflicted on Jews during WW2. “And we came here to the concentration camp Auschwitz. And we knew that from here we will not come out anymore... We knew the stories - that they will gas us and throw us in the ovens. This was 1944... we knew everything. And here we were.” Maus is an incredible tale that has so much to give to its reader. It was both insightful and addictive with its illustrations and style of storytelling. It allows the reader to gain a deeper understanding of how the camps were run and what it was like for the prisoners. I am so glad that this is how Mr. Spiegelman chose to write his father’s story and the story of those who didn’t live to tell it. “The biggest pile of bodies lay right next to the door where they tried to get out.” (from the gas chambers)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eliza Rapsodia

    Reseñar Maus supone una de las experiencias más gratificantes de mi vida porque es el segundo libro en 2015 al que le doy la nota máxima. Pues verán, desde hace muchos años siempre he sentido profunda fascinación por los temas históricos y sobre todo en torno a la segunda guerra mundial. Es un tema recurrente en mis lecturas y siempre me gusta aprender cosas nuevas sobre esta época terrible de la humanidad. Así que cuando conocí esta obra sabía que debía leerla en algún punto de mi vida y gracia Reseñar Maus supone una de las experiencias más gratificantes de mi vida porque es el segundo libro en 2015 al que le doy la nota máxima. Pues verán, desde hace muchos años siempre he sentido profunda fascinación por los temas históricos y sobre todo en torno a la segunda guerra mundial. Es un tema recurrente en mis lecturas y siempre me gusta aprender cosas nuevas sobre esta época terrible de la humanidad. Así que cuando conocí esta obra sabía que debía leerla en algún punto de mi vida y gracias a la biblioteca de la universidad he podido hacerlo. ¿Cómo se pueden calificar las memorias y recuerdos personales de alguien más? ¿Es acaso posible? Cuando una experiencia como esta es trasladada al papel es cuando a quien le pertenece deja de hacerlo. En 1992 Art Spiegelman ganó el primero y hasta ahora único premio Pulitzer que se le ha otorgado a un cómic en la historia. Y es precisamente la historia de su padre Wladek Spiegelman, un judío polaco sobreviviente del holocausto. En el cómic Wladek le cuenta a su hijo como después de que le liberaran de Bergen-Belsen pasó por un estudio fotográfico y se hizo este retrato usando un uniforme que representaba al usado en los campos de concentración. Paradójicamente lo hizo meses después de haberse despojado él mismo de un uniforme real, donde la estrella lo marcaba como un Jude (judío) para los alemanes. Wladek vivió en Auschwitz, trabajó en muchos oficios, vio de lejos los hornos crematorios, lo vio casi todo. En Bergen-Belsen estuvo incluso, donde tiempo antes murió Ana Frank y su hermana a manos de la tifus, que el mismo padeció y casi lo mata. Muchas cosas terribles sucedieron en esta época, pero Wladek vivió para contarlas. Art Spiegelman era un artista joven, casado con una francesa y residía en Nueva York. En los años setenta decidió volver a casa de su padre y lo llevó allí una necesidad de su vida: que él le contara su pasado antes y durante el holocausto. Por muchos meses Art habló y grabó las charlas con su padre, ese hombre enfermo, sumamente tacaño y por su puesto, solitario. Maus es una obra parte autobiográfica parte biográfica. Porque tanto Art como Wladek son protagonistas en la historia. La novela gráfica se divide en dos tomos: I Mi padre sangra historia y II Aquí comenzaron mis problemas. Art acude a la casa de Wladek y éste le va contando los recuerdos de a pocos mientras también se cuenta el momento actual de la familia Spiegelman. Es una narración a dos tiempos y a dos voces. Esta historia es distinta cuando te das cuenta que Art nunca tuvo una buena relación con Wladek. Los remordimientos también están presentes por ser un mal hijo para su madre Anja y eso le pesa. Toda su vida estuvo a la sombra del holocausto hudío y como esa experiencia dejó marcados a sus padres y fue un determinante en sus vidas. Art se desahogó al dibujar Maus, puede deducirse claramente. Maus abarca una gran cantidad de tiempo desde antes de la guerra e incluso después. Wladek Spiegelman y Anja Zybelberg son los padres de Art, judíos nacidos en Polonia que tuvieron una vida tranquila hasta la invasión del Tercer Reich a su país. Desde ahí el sufrimiento no hacia sino empezar. En la historia los judíos son representados como ratones, los polacos no judíos como cerdos, los alemanes como gatos y los estadounidenses como perros. Simbología que considero representativa porque a pesar de todos ser humanos en esta época eso ya no importaba, si eras judio ya eras algo muy distinto. La "raza" volvía a ser motivo de crueldad. Poco a poco vamos presenciando como Wladek evoca la progresión de la vida polaca desde la invasión hasta lo más cruel, lo más terrible. Primero perder la casa, el trabajo, luego la familia y posteriormente la libertad. En medio de la desesperanza, Wladek destaca por tener una suerte increíble a pesar de la tragedia. El talento para muchas cosas y una gran dosis de buena suerte salvaron al padre de Art de desgracias peores. ¿Cómo puede Art llevarse mal con su padre a pesar de todo lo que sufrió? Arbeit Macht Frei "El trabajo libera" a la entrada de Auschwitz I Es una de las lecciones que nos deja leer esta novela gráfica. Que a pesar de todo lo que suframos seguimos siendo seres humanos. Que muchas veces las experiencias sufridas no nos cambian como somos. Art no soportaba que su padre fuera tan tacaño y mezquino, pero es como si Wladek no dejara de recordar los días donde dos personas peleaban hasta sangrar por un pedazo de pan rancio y muchos morían de hambre frente a sus ojos. Pero Maus no es sólo la conflictiva relación de un hijo y su padre, sino que también es la historia de un superviviente que a pesar de todo tuvo mucha suerte. Los recuerdos de Wladek nos trasladan a la Polonia oprimida y donde los judíos lo perdieron todo para luego ser llevados a trabajar hasta la muerte. La novela gráfica no se corta en mostrarnos de buena mano todas las atrocidades cometidas no sólo contra los judíos que si bien fueron la mayoría, también contra disidentes del gobierno, prisioneros de guerra entre otros. El temible campo de trabajo y exterminio Auschwitz-Birkenau se ve retratado en la historia, siendo el lugar donde murieron la mayoría de los judíos durante todo el holocausto y siendo el campo más famoso hoy en día. El azar, el talento y algo de colaboración de muchas personas hicieron que Wladek y Anja sobrevivieran a años de terror. Pero sobrevivir también tiene un peso terrible y es la carga de los que se fueron, los que no volvieron a ver. Familias enteras perecieron en los campos y la compasión era una palabra desconocida por el régimen nazi. Los Spiegelman perdieron a casi todos sus familiares pero sobrevivieron para contarlo. ¿Entonces que puede decir u opinar uno sobre una historia tan personal? ¿A caso el horror se puede valorar? Leer Maus me dejó esa sensación, de dolor, de horror y de impotencia. Art hizo un inmenso trabajo al honrar a su padre a pesar de su mala relación. Porque a pesar de todo es un sobreviviente y los que sobreviven hacen bien en contar lo que los muertos ya no pueden.

  12. 5 out of 5

    LeeAnne

    The Complete Maus Art Spiegelman Probably the most informative and intimate journal of the holocaust I have ever read. Maus is really two parallel stories, not one. It jumps back and forth between the two stories, one set in the past (Poland), the other set in the present (NYC). Story 1: 1940’s Poland: Vladek Spiegelman tells how he survived the holocaust as a Polish-Jew. From the invasion, to the spread of Naziam, to his time in Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp as a tin worker at the gas cha The Complete Maus Art Spiegelman Probably the most informative and intimate journal of the holocaust I have ever read. Maus is really two parallel stories, not one. It jumps back and forth between the two stories, one set in the past (Poland), the other set in the present (NYC). Story 1: 1940’s Poland: Vladek Spiegelman tells how he survived the holocaust as a Polish-Jew. From the invasion, to the spread of Naziam, to his time in Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp as a tin worker at the gas chambers. Vladek is one of the only surviving camp survivors who had intimate knowledge of how the gas chambers facilities worked, because he worked there and lived to tell the tale. He saw how pesticide (Zyklon B) was dropped into the hollow columns to gas screaming victims and how they were burned in crematoriums afterwards. Most Jewish inmates who worked near the gas chambers and crematoriums were executed so they could not give testimony to the horrors they witnessed. Story 2: 1980’s New York City. Art details his creative process of composing his book about his dad's holocaust experiences. Art has a very antagonistic relationship with his father, Vledeck. We see Art trying to interview his reluctant father, pushing his father to recount his experiences. The holocaust permeates the Spiegelman's daily life, even though it took place many years ago. There is this need in our society to push the Holocaust into the past and keep it there, but we see throughout this novel that this is impossible. Survivors and their children don't have the luxury of just forgetting about it and moving on. You can stop talking about it, you can try to pretend it never happened, but the recollections of those horrible experiences never go away. You can't erase them. They haunt their victims. A predominant theme in the book is how traumatic events like the Holocaust continue to distort and shape people generations later, long after they are over. Children of Holocaust survivors are also affected by holocaust, secondhand, through their parents. They often feel guilty about leading such pampered lives, compared to their parents horrific experiences. So, survivor’s guilt stems from first hand experience (holocaust survivors who feel guilty for surviving when so many loved ones did not) and it reverberates down through generations (children of holocaust survivors). Vledeck's parenting style is warped by the long-term psychological effects the holocaust has on his behavior. In turn, Art's childhood is warped by Vledeck’s post-holocaust world view, a secondary repercussion of the Holocaust. Why Graphics? The graphics add power, context and tone to the text, providing deeper insight into the mixed feelings and thoughts of the characters. You can hear (read) a character say one thing in the text, but you might also see them thinking/doing something very different, which is expressed in graphics. Most of the text in the book are direct quotes from Art Spiegelman's father, Vladik. Sometimes the graphics will reflect the same mood and message expressed in the text. Other times the graphics might reflect Art's interpretation of what his dad is saying. This way the reader sees two very different interpretations of the same exact incident or story simultaneously. How brilliant is that? Art Spiegelman also uses animals to represent different races and nationalities. It's a very effective metaphor. Jews are drawn as mice, which reflects back to the anti-Semitic stereotype of Jews being subhuman rats. Germans are cats; they prey on Jewish mice. Americans are dogs, they fight the German cats. The French are frogs. The Polish are pigs; Nazis considered the Polish people to be pigs. Jewish Mice sometimes pretend to be Polish pigs to hide from the German Cats. They do this by wearing pigs masks. While creating the book, Art struggles with how he should draw his French wife who converted to Judaism to please his father. It encourages the reader think about the roles of race, ethnicity, nationality and religion. Is Art's wife a frog that transforms into a mouse? But she's still French. So is she half frog, half mouse? Is she a frog in a mouse mask? When can we stop talking about the Holocaust?: I understand that the holocaust can sometimes seem like a ghastly but impersonal genocide of countless, faceless victims. The magnitude and horror of it all can be so hard to stomach. But each of those six million people was an individual with their own personal story. Individual stories may not seem as important when compared to famous, historical figures like Hitler, Stalin, Churchill, Roosevelt, but learning about each individual story is critical to understanding the magnitude of the Holocaust. Recorded memories are the only way Holocaust survivors can maintain a connection to the stolen lives of those who were erased from the face of the earth by the Holocaust.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emer

    I never knew that a graphic novel could be so moving, so haunting and so phenomenally powerful. The complete Maus tells the tale of Hitler's Europe and the experiences of one Jewish man, the author/illustrator Art Spiegelman's father Vladek. It is a book that doesn't hold any punches and is jaw dropping in its exploration of humanity through both the atrocities and ethnic cleansing of that time and of how this moulds a man forever. I don't have the words to fully express all I'm feeling right no I never knew that a graphic novel could be so moving, so haunting and so phenomenally powerful. The complete Maus tells the tale of Hitler's Europe and the experiences of one Jewish man, the author/illustrator Art Spiegelman's father Vladek. It is a book that doesn't hold any punches and is jaw dropping in its exploration of humanity through both the atrocities and ethnic cleansing of that time and of how this moulds a man forever. I don't have the words to fully express all I'm feeling right now so please read these two reviews by AMANDA and FABIAN to fully grasp what this graphic novel is about. I don't read graphic novels. I haven't read a comic since I was a little kid reading the Beano. So maybe you might think this isn't for you... You'd be wrong. Everyone should read this. Highly recommended four and a half stars

  14. 4 out of 5

    María

    M A R A V I L L O S O. Me ha gustado muchísimo esta novela. Para empezar, nunca había leído una novela gráfica y tenía miedo de que no me gustara, pero al leer esta, me he dado cuenta de que me encantan. Ver ilustrado cada cosa que ocurre me ayuda a acercarme más a la historia. La forma en la que está contada la historia de Vladek Spiegelman también me ha gustado mucho. Vemos como él le va contando la historia a su hijo y también vemos la relación que tiene con su hijo y la vida que siguió llevand M A R A V I L L O S O. Me ha gustado muchísimo esta novela. Para empezar, nunca había leído una novela gráfica y tenía miedo de que no me gustara, pero al leer esta, me he dado cuenta de que me encantan. Ver ilustrado cada cosa que ocurre me ayuda a acercarme más a la historia. La forma en la que está contada la historia de Vladek Spiegelman también me ha gustado mucho. Vemos como él le va contando la historia a su hijo y también vemos la relación que tiene con su hijo y la vida que siguió llevando después. Es una historia que me ha atrapado, de hecho, siempre que cogía este libro me costaba mucho soltarlo. Me ha impactado ver por todas las situaciones tan horribles que tuvo que pasar este señor y una gran cantidad de judíos. Por muchas pelis/libros que lea sobre esto, me sigue horrorizando. Para terminar sólo decir que este libro es una obra de arte y creo que todo el mundo debería de darle una oportunidad. Le doy 5 estrellas, ya que lo único malo que veo es el hecho de no haberlo leído antes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kat Kennedy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Reading this book was like having an echo of a conversation with my husband's grandfather. Dziadek could be Vladek's twin brother if any of Vladek's poor family had survived the war. This book's most horrifying moment came, for me, at the loss of their two year old son, Richeu. I tried to imagine a world where my decision to keep my son with me and hope for a better future, cost him his life and considered how I would live with that for the rest of my life. I don't have the answer to that. All I k Reading this book was like having an echo of a conversation with my husband's grandfather. Dziadek could be Vladek's twin brother if any of Vladek's poor family had survived the war. This book's most horrifying moment came, for me, at the loss of their two year old son, Richeu. I tried to imagine a world where my decision to keep my son with me and hope for a better future, cost him his life and considered how I would live with that for the rest of my life. I don't have the answer to that. All I know is that my son got away with a helluva lot more bad behaviour that day then he normally would. I have no commentary to make on the war, the holocaust, the devestation or destruction because I have nothing intelligent or worthwhile to add other than the recognition that the crimes committed there were truly horrifying and disgusting. Though I hardly want to consider the type of human being I would be if I didn't feel that way.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    THE COMPLETE MAUS is, to date, the hardest, most emotionally draining novel I have read in my adult life. It was a heart-wrenching, but really necessary read for me, and I’m proud of myself for deciding to read something so far outside my comfort zone (I tend to shy away from both history and memoir/true story novels). The book is a story within a story. Art shows himself interviewing his father, Vladek, and his time spent with his father for part of this book, and the rest of the story is Vladek THE COMPLETE MAUS is, to date, the hardest, most emotionally draining novel I have read in my adult life. It was a heart-wrenching, but really necessary read for me, and I’m proud of myself for deciding to read something so far outside my comfort zone (I tend to shy away from both history and memoir/true story novels). The book is a story within a story. Art shows himself interviewing his father, Vladek, and his time spent with his father for part of this book, and the rest of the story is Vladek's experiences and survival of Auschwitz and how he survived throughout all of the invasion of Poland by Germany and the Nazis. Both sides shown in this felt completely honest and real. The art, while definitely not my favorite style, worked incredibly well for this story. There were times where it was just the art in panels, and I really felt like those were some of the stronger panels. The art was black and white, thick lines, and just overall felt really heavy. Most of the time, the panels felt really cramped, but I have a feeling this was intentional. I absolutely loved Art Spiegelman’s decision to depict the different people within this story as animals (Mice=the Jewish people, Pigs=the Polish people, and Cats=the Germans/Nazis). Also intentional, and something I really appreciated, was how honest and true to Vladek’s narration Art Spiegelman seemed to stay. In the book, you find out that Art recorded his father’s story, and I think he wrote Vladek’s words verbatim. There were times where the sentence structures were just a little off, and I could hear Vladek's voice so strongly during those times. It just really added another depth to this book. I wasn’t able to read this in one sitting and I also wasn’t able to pick up another book while taking a break from THE COMPLETE MAUS. But I’m really OK with that. I was able to really digest and contemplate on what I was reading, and I think taking my time helped me understand and fully immerse myself in Vladek’s experiences. If you decide to read this, just know that it didn’t seem like Vladek held back telling Art anything that he experienced. All the pain and loss that he went through at the hands of the Nazis was extremely haunting to read about. Vladek’s story will definitely stick with me for the rest of my life.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nickolas the Kid

    Πεντάστερο αριστούργημα! Χωρίς πολλά λόγια, μια εικονοιστορία που αξίζει να διαβαστεί από όλους, έτσι ώστε να μην ξεχνάει κανείς μας τις θηριωδίες των Ναζί στον ΒΠΠ. Δικαίως βραβεύτηκε, δικαίως αγαπήθηκε και δικαίως φιγουράρει στα graphic novels με τις πιο υψηλές βαθμολογίες. To σχέδιο δεν είναι κάτι το ιδιαίτερο αλλά η όλη ιστορία και η δυναμική των χαρακτήρων πραγματικά με έκαναν να μην θέλω να σταματήσω να διαβάζω. Η εξουσία του ανθρώπου πάνω σε συνανθρώπους του μπορεί να εξαλείψει τελείως την Πεντάστερο αριστούργημα! Χωρίς πολλά λόγια, μια εικονοιστορία που αξίζει να διαβαστεί από όλους, έτσι ώστε να μην ξεχνάει κανείς μας τις θηριωδίες των Ναζί στον ΒΠΠ. Δικαίως βραβεύτηκε, δικαίως αγαπήθηκε και δικαίως φιγουράρει στα graphic novels με τις πιο υψηλές βαθμολογίες. To σχέδιο δεν είναι κάτι το ιδιαίτερο αλλά η όλη ιστορία και η δυναμική των χαρακτήρων πραγματικά με έκαναν να μην θέλω να σταματήσω να διαβάζω. Η εξουσία του ανθρώπου πάνω σε συνανθρώπους του μπορεί να εξαλείψει τελείως την ανθρώπινη φύση και την λογική. ΥΓ: Οι ΕΒραίοι είναι ποντίκια, οι Γερμανοί γάτες, οι Πολωνοί γουρούνια, οι Αμερικάνοι σκύλοι, οι Γάλλοι βάτραχοι και οι τσιγγάνοι ακρίδες... Χρειάζεται να γράψω κάτι παραπάνω;;

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bettie☯

    Art Spiegelman warns of 'dangerous' outcome as Russian shops ban Maus This has been on my wishlist forever -looks like this is a good time to read it. "My father pulled out 14 of his teeth to escape. If you missed 12 teeth they let you go." - page 45, book I "The guards, it was Jews with big sticks, they acted so, just like the Germans" - page 106, book I

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Pre-review: OhmygodOhmygodOhmygodOhmygod! I'm cheating on J.M. Coetzee with Art Spiegelman. Actually, I'm not just cheating on him; I've left him. Review: Before I review this book, you should know something about me: I never read graphic novels. I normally have zero interest in reading graphic novels/comic books. Are those the same thing, by the way? I have no idea. That’s how little I’m interested in them. Anyway, Maus was one of the best things I’ve read in a long, long time! If you haven’t read Pre-review: OhmygodOhmygodOhmygodOhmygod! I'm cheating on J.M. Coetzee with Art Spiegelman. Actually, I'm not just cheating on him; I've left him. Review: Before I review this book, you should know something about me: I never read graphic novels. I normally have zero interest in reading graphic novels/comic books. Are those the same thing, by the way? I have no idea. That’s how little I’m interested in them. Anyway, Maus was one of the best things I’ve read in a long, long time! If you haven’t read it, please do. My pathetic reviewing skills aren’t going to do it justice, but you shouldn’t let that stop you from reading it. The basic outline is about a man interviewing his father, a Polish Holocaust survivor, for a book he is writing. The Jews are depicted as mice; the Nazis cats. There were so many layers to these books. First there were Vladek’s harrowing stories of surviving first Auschwitz, and then Dachau. Then there was the father/son dynamic, but also the survivor/child of a survivor and husband/wife dynamics. Because of this, I often found myself alternating between both laughter and tears. I adored Vladek and all of his quirks, but I also understood how difficult it must have been for Spiegelman to grow up with such a father. His writing showed his annoyance, anger, guilt, and his love. By some miracle, Spiegelman’s mother also survived the camps, and was reunited with Vladek after the war ended. I don’t want to give anything away, but the reader, and tragically, Spiegelman himself, weren’t able to hear much of her story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jon(athan) Nakapalau

    One of the most influential literary works ever...in or out of comics.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Praj

    Where should I commence to appraise this book? Must I begin from the detail that MAUS is a gratifying story of Vladek and Art OR that it is a sheer enlightenment through simplicity? Art Spiegelman in this astounding graphic novel reveals a fractured father-son relationship whilst focusing on the perils of the Holocaust. The story is set in Rego Park, NY where Art Spiegelman, a cartoonist tries to verbalize and grasp with his father and the Holocaust. Written over a period of thirteen years, MAUS Where should I commence to appraise this book? Must I begin from the detail that MAUS is a gratifying story of Vladek and Art OR that it is a sheer enlightenment through simplicity? Art Spiegelman in this astounding graphic novel reveals a fractured father-son relationship whilst focusing on the perils of the Holocaust. The story is set in Rego Park, NY where Art Spiegelman, a cartoonist tries to verbalize and grasp with his father and the Holocaust. Written over a period of thirteen years, MAUS comprises of two volumes. Volume I:-My Father Bleeds History:- The narrative initiates in the town of Czestochowa in Poland; native soil of Vladek Spiegelman(Art’s father).Young and vivacious Vladek is into the textile business who after having a torrid affair with Lucia ends up marrying a much wealthier Anja Zylberberg. Over the years Vladek is drafted into the Polish army where he endures severe anguish as a prisoner of war, captured by the Nazis. After his release when he heads back home to see his infant son Richieu, the family is forced into hiding as the Nazis started to hound the Jews. Volume II:-And Here My troubles Begin:- Encompasses Vladek’s experiences in Auschwitz and his familiarities with Anja’s existence in the neighboring camp,Birkenau. Finally, the prisoners are freed leading to the collapse of the Germans; however Vladek undergoes a tedious journey to Sosnowiec to be reunited with Anja. The plot shifts back and forth from illustrating Vladek’s saga to the present day when he is trying to put in picture the chronicles for his son Art. The current events reveal Vladek’s tryst with medical disabilities and his heart-wrenching yearning to bond with his only son during his twilight years. Art,the only surviving child of Vladek could never comprehend with his father’s suffrage and melancholic state. “I mean,I can’t even make any sense out of my relationship with my father…How am I supposed to make any sense out of Auschwitz?...Of the Holocaust?” Art’s effort to identify with his father’s life is delineated throughout the novel when he questions Vladek on Anja’s suicide or life in the concentration camps. Vladek on the other hand, still relives the horror of the Holocaust in his trivial arguments with Mala or his reminiscing of the war. It is justly said that to understand another’s horror one has to relive it. Maybe Art being raised in New York, could not identify with Vladek’s pain of losing Richieu, Anja and Auschwitz. He tried to find a “normal” father in Vladek; blaming Vladek for all the chaos in his life. The characterization of the Jews as “Mice” and the Nazis as “Cats” is accurately symbolic as the venomous predators and eternal nemesis. The depiction of these characters in various graphical sketches fetches emotions of factual individuals bringing a huge lump in your throat; especially when Art feels guilty of blaming his father for his mother’s suicide. The pain in Art’s words in failing to build affection towards his father makes you hypothesize about the numerous Holocaust survivors and their struggle to bond with their children. A victim of any kind faces a genuine struggle to find acceptance and understanding in the aftermath life. Similarly, Vladek wished he could have found an undying bond with Art in all his solitary being. MAUS is not a run of the mill comic; it is incorporation of the unspoken sentiments and assumed fallacies.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Foster

    “To die, it’s easy…but you have to struggle for life!” The only graphic novel to win the Pulitzer Prize, this brings the Holocaust home in a fresh way. Like Animal Farm, it uses the conceit of various animal associations: the Jews are mice, Poles are pigs, Nazis are cats, and Americans are dogs. Spiegelman draws what, from a distance of decades, his Polish father Vladek narrates about his almost unbelievable series of escapes, including time in Auschwitz. It’s often the minor stories that really “To die, it’s easy…but you have to struggle for life!” The only graphic novel to win the Pulitzer Prize, this brings the Holocaust home in a fresh way. Like Animal Farm, it uses the conceit of various animal associations: the Jews are mice, Poles are pigs, Nazis are cats, and Americans are dogs. Spiegelman draws what, from a distance of decades, his Polish father Vladek narrates about his almost unbelievable series of escapes, including time in Auschwitz. It’s often the minor stories that really bring the atmosphere of deprivation to life: getting sick in the ghetto from a cake made of scrounged ‘flour’, some of it actually soap powder; bartering with a Polish guard to give his friend a uniform that fits properly; keeping a spare lice-free uniform shirt carefully wrapped up to present at inspection times. “It’s a miracle he survived,” Spiegelman thinks of his father: some combination of good luck and cunning. Spiegelman gives the book an extra dimension by including his recording sessions with his father as a framing story for most chapters. On visits to his father and his second wife out in Rego Park, when he can get a word in edgewise over the couple’s bickering and his father’s complaints about his health and finances, he elicits Vladek’s memories. The narration is thus in Vladek’s own broken English, and we see how exasperating Spiegelman finds him – for being a penny pincher and racist against blacks, for instance – even as he’s in awe of his story. “No matter what I accomplish, it doesn’t seem like much compared to surviving Auschwitz,” he tells his shrink. The drawing style is fairly simplistic. It’s interesting to take as a counterpoint the four-page comic “Prisoner on the Hell Planet” (included in this volume) that Spiegelman wrote before any of the installments of Maus came out. From 1972, it’s about his release from a mental hospital and his mother Anja’s suicide – family tragedies that don’t get much space in a book already overloaded with sadness and loss. I prefer the style of these panels – ornate with cross-hatching, almost like woodcuts – yet it’s clear why, to get through the sheer mass of material, Spiegelman had to streamline things to accomplish Maus. You can see how this paved the way for comic artists like Roz Chast and Alison Bechdel. Their works share the same psychological depth when the artist is examining his/her relationship with parents. I’d recommend this to absolutely anyone, graphic novel fan or no. As Vladek’s second wife Mala observes, “It’s an important book. People who don’t usually read such stories will be interested.” (Vladek pipes up: “Yes. I don’t read ever such comics, and even I am interested.” Mala: “Of course you are interested. It’s your story!” / Vladek: “Yes. I know already my story by heart, and even I am interested.”)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Books I read rarely affect my emotions when I'm not reading it. A book can pull me every which way, make me feel horrified or saddened or joyful, but when I put it down, I'm in the same mood I was before I started reading it. Only occasionally can a book get under my skin, and Maus is one of them. I was actually happy to finish it, because I didn't like the way it was making me feel: anxious, upset, unhappy. And I've read Holocaust stuff before. It's not new. Something about the way Spiegelman c Books I read rarely affect my emotions when I'm not reading it. A book can pull me every which way, make me feel horrified or saddened or joyful, but when I put it down, I'm in the same mood I was before I started reading it. Only occasionally can a book get under my skin, and Maus is one of them. I was actually happy to finish it, because I didn't like the way it was making me feel: anxious, upset, unhappy. And I've read Holocaust stuff before. It's not new. Something about the way Spiegelman contrasted his day to day life, arguing with his dad, with the horror his dad went through, just got to me. I would feel irritated with Art's dad and then I'd see what he'd gone through and it kind of just tore me apart. When a book does this to me I have to give it five stars. (As an aside, I wondered throughout the whole book why he chose pigs to represent Polish people. As a person of Polish nationality myself, I was totally mystified about it. In looking at the Wikipedia article, I see: Spiegelman explained that he chose pigs in good faith because of their resemblance to famous American cartoon characters like Miss Piggy and Porky Pig. Oookay... still doesn't make much sense to me.)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eirini Proikaki

    Δεν είχα σκοπό να γράψω review για το Maus αλλά όταν ένα κόμικ σε επηρεάζει τόσο που βλέπεις εικόνες του και στον ύπνο σου νομίζω οτι πρέπει να πεις δυο λόγια ακομα κι αν σου φαίνονται φτωχά. Δεν ήξερα τι να γράψω.Οτι είναι συγκλονιστικό,σπαρακτικό,συγκινητικό,ανατριχιαστικό και όλα αυτά που συνήθως λέμε όταν διαβάζουμε ιστορίες για το Ολοκαύτωμα; Ο Art Spiegelman γράφει και σχεδιάζει την ιστορία επιβίωσης των γονιών του απο το Άουσβιτς όπως του τη διηγήθηκε ο πατέρας του και ταυτόχρονα μας μιλάει Δεν είχα σκοπό να γράψω review για το Maus αλλά όταν ένα κόμικ σε επηρεάζει τόσο που βλέπεις εικόνες του και στον ύπνο σου νομίζω οτι πρέπει να πεις δυο λόγια ακομα κι αν σου φαίνονται φτωχά. Δεν ήξερα τι να γράψω.Οτι είναι συγκλονιστικό,σπαρακτικό,συγκινητικό,ανατριχιαστικό και όλα αυτά που συνήθως λέμε όταν διαβάζουμε ιστορίες για το Ολοκαύτωμα; Ο Art Spiegelman γράφει και σχεδιάζει την ιστορία επιβίωσης των γονιών του απο το Άουσβιτς όπως του τη διηγήθηκε ο πατέρας του και ταυτόχρονα μας μιλάει και για τη σχέση του με τον ιδιότροπο πατέρα του όπως και για το πώς έφτασε να γράψει αυτό το βιβλίο. Είναι μια ιστορία τόσο δυνατή που με λίγα λόγια καταφέρνει να αναδείξει τη φρίκη που εζησαν αυτοί οι άνθρωποι που βρέθηκαν ξαφνικά κυνηγημένοι να κρυβονται σαν τα ποντίκια και να χάνουν ότι είχαν και δεν είχαν. Το σχέδιο λιτό ασπρόμαυρο και πολύ έξυπνο.Κάποια καρέ πραγματικά με ενθουσίασαν όπως πχ ένα σταυροδρόμι στο οποίο βρίσκονται οι γονείς του Art χωρίς να ξέρουν που να πανε για να γλιτώσουν σχεδιάζεται σαν σβάστικα ή ο ίδιος ο Art που πιεσμένος απο τους δημοσιογράφους δείχνει να μικραίνει σε μέγεθος όπως και όταν μιλάει με έναν ψυχολόγο για τη σχέση με τον πατέρα του. Δεν ξέρω τι άλλο να πω.Απλά διαβάστε το.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Conejo Literario

    Terminé bañada en lágrimas. No solo va derecho a los favoritos del año, sino a los favoritos de la vida. 10/10.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Antonio

    Reto 12 libros - 12 meses del grupo Sangre de tinta Noviembre: Una Novela gráfica No deja de sorprenderme como las historias que muestran las mas grandes crueldades, son a veces las mas realistas, las mas humanas. La historia quizás les sea familiar, Judíos, Segunda guerra mundial, Alemanes, campos de concentración, Polacos, y Estadounidenses; Maus nos relata la historia biográfica de de Vladek Spiegelman, con el giro de ser contada a través de los dibujos de su hijo Art en el formato del Cómic, Reto 12 libros - 12 meses del grupo Sangre de tinta Noviembre: Una Novela gráfica No deja de sorprenderme como las historias que muestran las mas grandes crueldades, son a veces las mas realistas, las mas humanas. La historia quizás les sea familiar, Judíos, Segunda guerra mundial, Alemanes, campos de concentración, Polacos, y Estadounidenses; Maus nos relata la historia biográfica de de Vladek Spiegelman, con el giro de ser contada a través de los dibujos de su hijo Art en el formato del Cómic,y para las personas que no les gusta este formato, o tienen sus dudas con respecto a su seriedad o importancia, sepan que es el único cómic hasta la fecha que ha ganado el premio Pulitzer, algo digno de mención. Vladek es uno de los pocos Judíos polacos sobreviviente a la guerra, podríamos decir que sobrevivió por su inteligencia, o su disposición a trabajar en lo que sea, a hacer lo que sea, a buscar amistades donde sea, y muchas cosas mas, pero lo cierto es que tuvo suerte, porque muchos mas, quizás mejores personas o ratones, ya les hablare de eso, no lo lograron. Art, el hijo de Vladek, nos cuenta sin tapujos la vida de su padre, que en la historia el mismo esta compartiendo con su hijo, Vladek esta muy lejos de ser un héroe o un personaje perfecto, es un viejo cascarrabias, avaro, mezquino y racista, pero hizo todo lo que pudo por sobrevivir, y porque su familia sobreviviera, lo que mas llama la atención del cómic es que los personajes son animales antropomórficos, divididos según su religión o país de origen, así los Judíos son ratones, los alemanes son gatos chiste cruel, los Estadounidenses son Perros, los Polacos son cerdos y así sucesivamente. Las paginas del cómic te atrapan desde el primer momento, cuadro a cuadro la historia florece con una narración a dos tiempos lograda, y con hechos históricos impactante que no aburren para nada. Definitivamente lo recomiendo a todos

  27. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    If this book hadn’t been a selection for my book club in January, I would never have picked it up. Not because I’m a snob about graphic novels—I think they are legitimate form of literature and very enjoyable to boot. But I might have avoided Maus because of the subject matter—I haven’t read very much about the holocaust and that is by choice. I guess I’m a chicken, but I hate exploring just how terribly we can treat one another. I haven’t yet read Romeo Dallaire’s book about the Rwandan genocid If this book hadn’t been a selection for my book club in January, I would never have picked it up. Not because I’m a snob about graphic novels—I think they are legitimate form of literature and very enjoyable to boot. But I might have avoided Maus because of the subject matter—I haven’t read very much about the holocaust and that is by choice. I guess I’m a chicken, but I hate exploring just how terribly we can treat one another. I haven’t yet read Romeo Dallaire’s book about the Rwandan genocide either—I’ve got exactly the same issue with it. Spiegelman doesn’t shy away from showing the atrocities, the fear, and the damage done to those who survived the Second World War. And survival is never taken for granted—it happened when luck and hard work combined to keep people alive. I think that works like this are important to keep the memories of these events alive and in the public consciousness—our first hand witnesses are aging and won’t be with us much longer. The Canadian veterans that I know are in their 80s and 90s, so holocaust survivors will be in the same age range and probably experiencing health problems relating back to war time conditions. This graphic novel format makes this history accessible to a new generation in a form that they can appreciate. I am of two minds regarding the depictions of various nationalities as animals, Jews as mice, Germans as cats, Poles as pigs, etc. On one hand, it insulates us a little bit from the harrowing history that is being related. We can feel a bit of a remove that makes it easier to read. But I can help wondering if that is a good thing? I also a bit bothered by the nationalities being represented by completely different species. After all, we are all one species and if one nationality is capable of genocide, every nationality is capable of it. We’ve had enough atrocities take place since WWII that we know that to be true. Separate species draws the “us” and “them” boundaries just a little too clearly, when we know from the novel itself that some Jews were “collaborators” and some Germans resisted the Nazis. There’s enough bad and good stuff to go around. I did, however, admire Spiegelman’s brave decision to explore his relationship with his father on the page. It became obvious very early in the narrative that survival itself had not made his father a happy man. Instead, he seemed to become deeply suspicious, rigid in his ideas, selfish, and generally unpleasant. The suicide of his wife (who suffered from mental illness before the war) may have solidified him into this barricaded position, to which he cannot admit his second wife or even his son. I couldn’t help but feel sorry for a man who so desperately needed human compassion and love and who kept stubbornly poking it away with a stick. How many generations will it take to remove this psychic damage from families of holocaust survivors? Spiegelman is brave to expose his struggles to help, accept, and love his father—he is loaded with guilt for not having been present during the worst years, for being the child that survived, for disliking his father, for not being able to provide the unconditional support that his father seems to expect. Smaller versions of this play out in many families (I watched my father struggle with miniature versions of these same issues), so in many ways this is a universal story. A valuable study in human nature and family relationships as well as recent history.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Proença

    "Samuel Beckett disse uma vez: «Cada palavra é como uma mancha desnecessária no silêncio e no nada». Mas, por outro lado, ele teve de o DIZER." "quantos livros já foram escritos sobre o Holocausto. Para quê? As pessoas não mudaram... Talvez precisem de um Holocausto novo e maior." "muitas empresas que prosperaram durante o regime nazi são hoje mais ricas do que nunca. Não sei... Talvez TODA A GENTE tenha de se sentir culpada. TODA A GENTE! PARA SEMPRE!" Em 2014 tentei ler Maus e desisti; porqu "Samuel Beckett disse uma vez: «Cada palavra é como uma mancha desnecessária no silêncio e no nada». Mas, por outro lado, ele teve de o DIZER." "quantos livros já foram escritos sobre o Holocausto. Para quê? As pessoas não mudaram... Talvez precisem de um Holocausto novo e maior." "muitas empresas que prosperaram durante o regime nazi são hoje mais ricas do que nunca. Não sei... Talvez TODA A GENTE tenha de se sentir culpada. TODA A GENTE! PARA SEMPRE!" Em 2014 tentei ler Maus e desisti; porque às vezes sou uma imbecil e dou importância a coisas mesquinhas desprezando o que é importante. Felizmente, de vez em quando, tenho oportunidade de me corrigir. Desta vez foi a minha filha, mais do que com palavras, pelo olhar e pelo tom de voz, que me transmitiu o seu sentir este livro. Na altura, o meu erro foi tentar ler esta obra como uma peça literária, com frases bonitas, personagens simpáticas, etc, e não como o que ela verdadeiramente é: um documento histórico sobre o sofrimento de um homem, de um povo, vítimas de um horror inimaginável. Quem pensa que já leu tudo sobre as abominações que os nazis inventaram para torturar e exterminar um povo, engana-se. Há sempre testemunhas de novas atrocidades; que, neste livro, ferem profundamente porque além das palavras estão as imagens, embora em desenhos a preto e branco, que se cravam na nossa mente não nos permitindo esquecê-las na página seguinte. Não vou apagar a minha primeira opinião, porque o passado não pode, nem deve, ser apagado; quando muito rasurado. (30 de abril de 2016) ____________________________________ "A narrativa mais comovente e eficaz alguma vez escrita sobre o Holocausto." - The Wall Street Journal Através de desenhos - em que as personagens são animais - o autor conta a história do seu pai desde a juventude até à sua deportação para Aushwitz. Li cerca de cem páginas, em trezentas, e custou-me tanto! Como tanto me custa escrever uma opinião honesta sobre o que li. O tema do Holocausto nazi perturba-me, comove-me, revolta-me, assusta-me... e por isso gostava tanto de gostar deste livro! Mas não consigo... Para poder apreciar um livro não me basta o enredo e as personagens, necessito de gostar da escrita. Faz-me muita confusão estar a ler num português incorrecto. O pai de Art Spiegelman começou a falar inglês já em idade avançada, por isso a forma gramatical e sintática não era a mais correcta, a qual foi mantida pelo autor no original e exigida nas traduções. Também não gosto dos desenhos nem da sua simbologia - os judeus são ratos e os nazis são gatos. Aqui, no Goodreads, quase todos lhe dão cinco estrelas. Mas eu não posso. Prefiro optar por não lhe dar qualquer estrela. Seria injusto e desrespeitoso baixar a média de um livro, que conta uma história verídica de um horror indescritível, só porque eu sou "miudinha". (24 de julho de 2014)

  29. 5 out of 5

    diegomarcapaginas

    Una maravilla de cómic que refleja la vida y las experiencias de un judío polaco en el holocausto nazi. Lo mejor sin duda son los flashbacks y la crudeza de la historia. Art hizo un gran trabajo visibilizando y dándo alma a un acontecimiento histórico que aún hoy en día levanta ampollas.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Arnie

    When I was a kid I read comic books (mostly Superman). The Maus books are the only graphic novels I've read and I consider them masterpieces (Mausterpieces?). Like Spiegelman's alter ego, I was a middle class child growing up in Queens (NYC), the son of Holocaust survivors and couldn't communicate with my father when I was growing up. He got it down perfectly. It was spot on and ranks among the best of Holocaust related literature.

  31. 4 out of 5

    Mia Nauca

    Me encantó, la mejor novela gráfica que he leído en mi vida. Cruda y sentimental a la vez.

  32. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    This was an amazing read. This was so good. I've known about it for a long time but somehow never sought it out. Maybe it was a bias against graphic novels? Not sure. I'm so glad I finally read it. This is a picture of human strength and frailty, humane and savage behavior, done in a novel way that seems to make it even more immediate and real.

  33. 5 out of 5

    Kirk

    This was our second book in the local library's discussion of Jewish graphic novels. It is, of course, the most famous and most celebrated exemplar of the genre (if you don't count the superhero stuff). What is amazing about the book is the emotional resonance Spiegelman manages to pack into his panels. In telling the story of his father's experience in the Holocaust, the author refuses to sentimentalize or pander. The most striking innovation is the use of mice for Jews, an appropriation of the This was our second book in the local library's discussion of Jewish graphic novels. It is, of course, the most famous and most celebrated exemplar of the genre (if you don't count the superhero stuff). What is amazing about the book is the emotional resonance Spiegelman manages to pack into his panels. In telling the story of his father's experience in the Holocaust, the author refuses to sentimentalize or pander. The most striking innovation is the use of mice for Jews, an appropriation of the racist anti-Semitism of vermin found throughout German propaganda. Other startling moments: the insertion of one of Spiegelman's early comic books to illustrate the lingering grief of his mother's suicide (he was barely 20 when she took her life), and the occasional use of a real picture---Spiegelman's father in his Auschwitz uniform on the final page---to break the continuity of the drawings. Best of all are the characterizations: Spiegelman depicts himself (Artie) as ambivalent but committed to his father, while Vladek is aloof, intense, but ultimately heroic for the mere fact of his survival. A classic, through and through.

  34. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Ayala

    Historias como estas, que solo buscan contar algo que sucedió y terminan marcando y gustando demasiado.

  35. 5 out of 5

    Elilith

    Brillante. Una forma original, visual y conmovedora de mostrar uno de los episodios más horribles de la historia de la humanidad.

  36. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    This is not an easy graphic novel to read. The illustrations are beautiful, but the simple black and white style reminds the reader that the subject matter is one of the darkest periods of modern history. This very personal glimpse into the horrors of the Holocaust touch on many complex emotions: loyalty, fear, survivor’s guilt, anger… Art Spiegelman’s father Vladek is a Holocaust survivor, who grew up and lived in Poland, was drafted into the Polish army, lived in a P.O.W. camp, the Jewish ghett This is not an easy graphic novel to read. The illustrations are beautiful, but the simple black and white style reminds the reader that the subject matter is one of the darkest periods of modern history. This very personal glimpse into the horrors of the Holocaust touch on many complex emotions: loyalty, fear, survivor’s guilt, anger… Art Spiegelman’s father Vladek is a Holocaust survivor, who grew up and lived in Poland, was drafted into the Polish army, lived in a P.O.W. camp, the Jewish ghettos, was eventually sent to Auschwitz and saw countless family members and friends die before the end of the war and his eventual relocation in America. The graphic novel tells the story of Art getting his father to open up about his life and tell him what he went through, as he himself tries to understand why he struggles to connect with Vladek. I hadn’t expected that roughly half of this book is actually about Art coming to terms with what his parents endured, with his issues making art about the Holocaust and making money (not to mention getting famous) off this work he feels incredibly uneasy about. There was a history of depression and possible mental illness in his family (you learn early on that this mother was depressive and committed suicide) that their history probably amplified. He uses an interesting meta approach to discuss this, illustrating conversations with his wife and therapist, to illustrate that the experience of creating this graphic novel was a struggle on many different levels. This harrowing portrait of the multi-generational consequences of war is probably what gutted me most as I read this: even long after the bombs stopped dropping, damage continues to be inflicted on people who weren’t even born during the war because of the unimaginable reality their parents had to survive. This book has historical significance both from its subject, but also because it was one of the first graphic novels that got serious academic interest, and the first to ever win a Pulitzer Prize: the medium had often been dismissed as comic strips before, but Spiegelman’s use of metaphor and the very intimate story he chose to tell showed that graphic novels were not limited to Superman and Archie stories. This makes “Maus” an important and seminal work that’s worth a read if only on that basis (and yes, I am aware that underground comics had touched non-traditional topics before and used a post-modernist approach, but I am strictly talking about more mainstream publications). The representations of different groups of people as different animals bothered me at first, because it felt like an easy generalization. But I read an interview with Spiegelman where he discusses where the idea comes from (old German propaganda films that depicted Jews as vermin, for instance) and also that he wanted to underline the absurdity of dividing people by assuming that each ethnicity has a uniform look or set of physical traits that defines them as human beings. I get the point he is trying to make: the anthropomorphic animals also make the incredibly difficult subject a little easier to absorb. I’m not sure I could have read the whole book in a couple of sittings had the drawings been more realistic. Imperfect but highly recommended.

  37. 4 out of 5

    El Biblionauta

    Está muy bien ir a Eurodisney, educar a nuestras hijas con los valores de las nuevas princesas Disney (decididas y valientes como Mulan o Vaiana). Leer a Thomas Pynchon y que éste te haga notar que el Pato Donald se afeita todos los días, porque cuando se queda dos días perdido en una balsa en alta mar tiene barba. Reflexionar acerca de que los cuervos de Dumbo son negros y hablan como negros, mientras que en la traducción de los años cuarenta hablan como gitanos andaluces… Ahora que Disney tien Está muy bien ir a Eurodisney, educar a nuestras hijas con los valores de las nuevas princesas Disney (decididas y valientes como Mulan o Vaiana). Leer a Thomas Pynchon y que éste te haga notar que el Pato Donald se afeita todos los días, porque cuando se queda dos días perdido en una balsa en alta mar tiene barba. Reflexionar acerca de que los cuervos de Dumbo son negros y hablan como negros, mientras que en la traducción de los años cuarenta hablan como gitanos andaluces… Ahora que Disney tiene Star Wars, ahora que es dueña y señora de Marvel Cómics, no exagero cuando digo que la obra de Spiegelman debería ser lectura obligatoria a todos los institutos del mundo. Porque es ética y estética o, como decía don Juan Manuel (no Soldevilla, sino el sobrino de Alfonso X) en el prólogo de El Conde Lucanor, se debe mezclar la medicina amarga con un poco de miel. La reseña completa en español en http://elbiblionauta.com/es/2017/01/2... La ressenya sencera en català a http://elbiblionauta.com/ca/2017/01/2...

  38. 5 out of 5

    Leonel

    No se como reseñar este libro, siempre es mas fácil escribir sobre libros malos que sobre obras tan espectaculares como ésta. Es crudo, escalofriante, aterrador, adictivo y, sin embargo, por momentos nos permite relajar con un poco de humor después de tanto machaque cerebral. Nunca leo novelas gráficas, hasta ahora lo único que leí aparte de Maus fue El Eternauta que me pareció otra maravilla, quizás tuve suerte. Todo lo que eligió Spiegelman para escribirlo estuvo bien. El formato cómic, los di No se como reseñar este libro, siempre es mas fácil escribir sobre libros malos que sobre obras tan espectaculares como ésta. Es crudo, escalofriante, aterrador, adictivo y, sin embargo, por momentos nos permite relajar con un poco de humor después de tanto machaque cerebral. Nunca leo novelas gráficas, hasta ahora lo único que leí aparte de Maus fue El Eternauta que me pareció otra maravilla, quizás tuve suerte. Todo lo que eligió Spiegelman para escribirlo estuvo bien. El formato cómic, los distintos animales para representar a judíos, nazis, etc., el quiebre entre historia aterradora y momentos simpáticos de los protagonistas. Creo que la crudeza es totalmente necesaria y quizás mi única "crítica" es que me hubiera gustado tener más detalles, mas extensión, porque nunca es suficiente para poder relatar la realidad que se vivió en esa época y poder leerlo directamente de un sobreviviente es un lujo, y sobretodo de esta manera tan atrapante que hace que con cada página quieras leer 10 más. Dudo que el autor haya escatimado en recursos y seguramente haya hecho lo imposible para estrujar la memoria de Vladek, así que no es una crítica en si. Un 10 absoluto, must-read, voy por Metamaus.

  39. 4 out of 5

    Anita Vela

    Reseña completa: http://anitavelabooks.blogspot.com.es... Maus es una novela gráfica basada en hechos reales y que nos cuenta como una familia judía vivió el holocausto nazi. No es una historia fácil de leer, es dura, pero merece mucho la pena. En el blog os cuento más: http://anitavelabooks.blogspot.com.es...

  40. 4 out of 5

    Dolceluna

    La freschezza del tratto fumettistico sposa la volontà di narrare un tema di grande portata come quello dell'Olocausto. E ne nasce un autentico capolavoro, termine forse abusato nell'ambito delle recensioni letterarie, ma che in questo caso risulta più che appropriato. Maus è innanzitutto la storia di una testimonianza, quella del vecchio Vladek, ebreo di origine polacca ora residente negli Stati Uniti il quale, su richiesta del figlio Art (l'autore), narra la storia della sua vita, dal suo matr La freschezza del tratto fumettistico sposa la volontà di narrare un tema di grande portata come quello dell'Olocausto. E ne nasce un autentico capolavoro, termine forse abusato nell'ambito delle recensioni letterarie, ma che in questo caso risulta più che appropriato. Maus è innanzitutto la storia di una testimonianza, quella del vecchio Vladek, ebreo di origine polacca ora residente negli Stati Uniti il quale, su richiesta del figlio Art (l'autore), narra la storia della sua vita, dal suo matrimonio con Anja nella Polonia degli anni '30, alle persecuzioni razziali, all'internamento nel capo di sterminio di Auschwitz, fino alla liberazione e alla rinascita di una nuova vita in un nuovo paese...il tutto corredato da geniali scelte grafiche di grande impatto visivo (quali la rappresentazione dell'umanità in razze di animali antropomorfi, topi per gli ebrei, gatti per i nazisti, maiali per i polacchi) che riescono a strappare qualche tenero sorriso nonostante la tragicità dell'argomento trattato. Ma Maus va al di là di una semplice testimonianza sulla Shoah: attraverso il rapporto difficile, a tratti teso, fatto di cose taciute e poi confessate, tra Vladek e suo figlio, Spiegelmann si spinge sino ad esplorare il tema dei meccanismi di trasmissione del trauma dai sopravvissuti della Shoah ai figli, membri della cosiddetta seconda generazione. Già, perchè Vladek, prototipo tra l'altro del tipico ebreo avido, è una persona fortemente traumatizzata e distrutta da un senso di colpa sofferto le cui conseguenze cadono irremidiabilmente sulle spalle di figlio, che si sforza invano di comprendere le sue manie e le sue irrazionalità...ne emerge un quadro dunque, che offre molteplici spunti e riflessioni dal punto di vista psicologico, oltre che storico. Mi ha emozionata tanto, Maus. Ma mi ha anche addolorata, incantata, divertita, rapita in un mondo terribile e in modo magico, senza traccia di pietismo e segni di banalità. Ricorderò per sempre le disavventure di questi topolini, costretti a indossare una maschera di gatti per fuggire a coloro che li volevano morti...con loro ho riso, sofferto, riflettuto, lottato. Impossibile non amare questo capolavoro, un gioiello assoluto da leggere e possedere.

  41. 4 out of 5

    Roberto

    Una historia más sobre el holocausto judío durante la II Guerra Mundial. Sin embargo, su formato: cómic, ofrece un enfoque y unos matices muy sugerentes. Los díbujos no son especialmente artísticos, de líneas sencillas, tan monótonos que en ocasiones el contexto o los diálogos son los que facilitan distinguir entre los personajes. Ésta indiferenciación no es casual, sino metáfora de la humillación y el anonimato a que se vieron sometidos los prisioneros en los campos de concentración reducidos Una historia más sobre el holocausto judío durante la II Guerra Mundial. Sin embargo, su formato: cómic, ofrece un enfoque y unos matices muy sugerentes. Los díbujos no son especialmente artísticos, de líneas sencillas, tan monótonos que en ocasiones el contexto o los diálogos son los que facilitan distinguir entre los personajes. Ésta indiferenciación no es casual, sino metáfora de la humillación y el anonimato a que se vieron sometidos los prisioneros en los campos de concentración reducidos a un número grabado en la piel. En cambio, el zoomorfismo de las distintas nacionalidades: gatos alemanes, perros americanos, ratones judíos, cerdos polacos, …; ayuda a la comprensión de las diversas situaciones sociales que se produjeron durante el conflicto bélico. Si los críticos se empeñan en utilizar la extraña palabreja de metaliteratura, ésta obra sería un metacómic, es decir, el cómic dentro del cómic. Realmente “Maus” es la historia de la elaboración del cómic “Maus”: recopilación de testimonios paternos, documentación, búsqueda de fotografías. reflexión sobre la capacidad del cómic para contar el holocausto, la elección de unos animales u otros para representar a los personajes o exposición autobiográfica de los sentimientos que llevan al autor a escribir la historia: culpa, confrontación paterno-filial, ausencia materna,… Pero es tal la fuerza de la historia contada por el padre que prevalece sobre cualquier consideración intelectual y literaria. Un relato duro, cruel, en el que los gestos de aparente generosidad esconden un pragmático interés, donde los sentimientos se ven anegados por la realidad de la supervivencia y en fin, donde los supervivientes se plantean si en el fondo han sido ganadores viendo las secuelas que les han acompañado a lo largo de su vida.

  42. 4 out of 5

    Filipa

    Será que quer dizer alguma coisa sobre a minha pessoa o facto de adorar livros sobre o Holocausto? Já li alguns livros sobre o Holocausto e segunda guerra mundial. São sempre livros que adoro e ainda mais quando são histórias a relatar acontecimentos que realmente aconteceram. Penso que o primeiro de todos foi "O diário de Anne Frank" que li... e reli... e reli... e reli... Desde aí que de vez em quando, gosto de dar um pulo para dentro de histórias do género. O último livro fenomenal que li do tema Será que quer dizer alguma coisa sobre a minha pessoa o facto de adorar livros sobre o Holocausto? Já li alguns livros sobre o Holocausto e segunda guerra mundial. São sempre livros que adoro e ainda mais quando são histórias a relatar acontecimentos que realmente aconteceram. Penso que o primeiro de todos foi "O diário de Anne Frank" que li... e reli... e reli... e reli... Desde aí que de vez em quando, gosto de dar um pulo para dentro de histórias do género. O último livro fenomenal que li do tema foi "A bibliotecária de Auschwitz" que recomendo 300 vezes. O que nunca tinha lido é um livro sobre o Holocausto em banda desenhada. Um livro sobre o Holocausto em banda desenhada e sabendo já o final, poderia retirar algum prazer na sua descoberta, pois quando iniciamos a leitura já sabemos que a história é contada pelo filho de um sobrevivente que lhe relata as coisas horrendas que passou. Que viu. Ouviu. Viveu. Mas isso... não aconteceu. Em "Maus", Spiegelman conta-nos então em bandas a história do seu pai. Só que, também não se limita a isso. Conta-nos também a história de quando ele estava a escrever a história, ou seja, tão depressa o leitor está com Vladek (o pai de Artie - que é uma pessoa super esperta, engenhosa e que nunca perde a esperança e coragem) quando tudo começou, quando as SS chegaram à Polónia e quiseram (e fizeram-no) infernizar a vida aos judeus e, ainda quando por fim vai parar a Auschwitz, como, estamos com Vladek e Art, no presente, a falarem disso tudo e ainda de coisas do dia-a-dia. Como o pai de Art ficou afectado com a guerra e como isso afectou o relacionamento de ambos, como Art fica com receio de colocar esta história "para fora", os problemas de saúde de Vladek e ainda os muitos sentimentos de insegurança de Art. E por estar em banda desenhada, a história ficou mais fácil de ser lida? Não. E por estar em bonecos, o horror ficou mais disfarçado? Não. Se tanto, de alguma maneira, conseguiu maximizar ainda mais a dor de um sobrevivente que perdeu tudo excepto a sua vida...

  43. 5 out of 5

    Scarlet Cameo

    "-¡Creía que habías sido liberado como prisionero de guerra! - Y así era...las leyes internacionales nos protegían un poco como prisioneros de guerra polacos ¡Pero a un judío del Reich podía matarlo cualquiera por la calle!" Esta es una historia triste, las memorias de una persona que paso por el Tercer Reich y sobrevivió para contar lo que paso, además de que es un vistazo de como esta experiencia dejo una marca perpetua en la vida de los perseguidos. En esta primera parte se nos habla de las si "-¡Creía que habías sido liberado como prisionero de guerra! - Y así era...las leyes internacionales nos protegían un poco como prisioneros de guerra polacos ¡Pero a un judío del Reich podía matarlo cualquiera por la calle!" Esta es una historia triste, las memorias de una persona que paso por el Tercer Reich y sobrevivió para contar lo que paso, además de que es un vistazo de como esta experiencia dejo una marca perpetua en la vida de los perseguidos. En esta primera parte se nos habla de las situaciones más "suaves" de la vida de Vladek, donde sí bien es llega a ser prisionero logra mantener su esencia humana y no pasa a la despersonalización y deshumanización que se ve posteriormente. Uno de los punto más fuertes es ver como la personificación (ratones para judíos, gatos para los nazis y cerdos para los polacos no judíos) se va haciendo más notoria conforme avanza la historia, cada uno de ellos va tomando características que atribuimos a esos animales y se convierten en parte de su personalidad. Una historia que tiene mayor impacto gracias a las imágenes que, sí bien son sencillas, demuestran un gran impacto y le dan mas fuerza a lo que vas leyendo, conforme las miras puedes ir adentrandonte y proyectando la historia en tu cabeza de manera muy realista. Una historia muy recomendada en la que no encontraras datos nuevos de la Segunda Guerra Mundial pero te permitirá ver de cerca lo que sufrieron los perseguidos.

  44. 4 out of 5

    Hershey

    Such a poignant book. My heart feels heavy and it hurts. Maus, I don't know what to say about this book. I don't want to think about those people in this book. It's just too painful. We waste so much in life. We take things for granted. And we always realize the importance of these things once they're gone forever. But what's the point in realizing its value once it's gone? This is what Maus taught me. Ah, it hurts. I can't review this book. Simply cannot. But I'm obviously going to try. Maus is a Such a poignant book. My heart feels heavy and it hurts. Maus, I don't know what to say about this book. I don't want to think about those people in this book. It's just too painful. We waste so much in life. We take things for granted. And we always realize the importance of these things once they're gone forever. But what's the point in realizing its value once it's gone? This is what Maus taught me. Ah, it hurts. I can't review this book. Simply cannot. But I'm obviously going to try. Maus is a story about Art's father, Vladek, Art's relationship with his father and a lot of other things. It's a story about love. It's a story about loss and pain. It's a story about the Nazis' cruelty. It's a story about survival. And all of it is real. I suggest everyone to read this book at least once in their lifetime.

  45. 4 out of 5

    Danger

    Wow. Just wow. This has been one of the best and most affecting books on WWII/The Holocaust I’ve ever read. While the horrors it relayed were the same horrors I’ve read about and been taught about in the past, it was the characterizations that made this particular story so much more impactful. And this graphic novel stretches way beyond just the survival of a Jewish Pole under Reich rule by showing the lasting effects of the main character’s time in Auschwitz, and how they now affect his son (th Wow. Just wow. This has been one of the best and most affecting books on WWII/The Holocaust I’ve ever read. While the horrors it relayed were the same horrors I’ve read about and been taught about in the past, it was the characterizations that made this particular story so much more impactful. And this graphic novel stretches way beyond just the survival of a Jewish Pole under Reich rule by showing the lasting effects of the main character’s time in Auschwitz, and how they now affect his son (the author of this book) and his current relationship with his idiosyncratic father. The scope here is vast, the implications are resonant, and the delivery is heartbreaking. The weakest point of this book is the artwork, which is B&W, unadorned, and pragmatic, though after the first 20 or 30 pages I was so wrapped up in the story it could’ve been stick figures and I still would’ve been on board. 5 big stars from me!

  46. 5 out of 5

    Barry Pierce

    I really, really loved this. It's a fascinating and fresh portrayal of a (yet another) victim's experience of the Holocaust. I loved the meta aspect of this as well, the actual presentation of how the novel was written is fascinating. However, my one criticism is that I feel Spiegelman didn't use the whole mice and cats metaphor as well as he could. This novel would have had the exact same impact and tone if he just drew everyone as humans. I feel like the anthropomorphism was... pointless. Ther I really, really loved this. It's a fascinating and fresh portrayal of a (yet another) victim's experience of the Holocaust. I loved the meta aspect of this as well, the actual presentation of how the novel was written is fascinating. However, my one criticism is that I feel Spiegelman didn't use the whole mice and cats metaphor as well as he could. This novel would have had the exact same impact and tone if he just drew everyone as humans. I feel like the anthropomorphism was... pointless. There is no point in the Jews being mice and the Nazis being cats. It just didn't work in my eyes. This is still however one of the best WWII narratives out there and an essential pillar in the art of the graphic novel.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.